Saturday, November 4, 2017

11: Koryo low section hammerfist

Sources: Majest, Ebrahim Saadati
Before I take another break from the blog, I wanted to look at a set from the kukki-taekwondo form Koryo. Near the end of the form is a circular, low section hammerfist strike, performed in slow motion. It seems there is no consensus -- or even many ideas -- on what the movement is for. After playing around with it though, I found something which might be close to the original intent of the set.

We can apply the movement against some sort of double grab (like an attempted front bear hug), beginning with the preceding move, the elbow strike.
  • Turn 90-degrees as you step forward and elbow strike your opponent, creating space. 
  • Push off the opponent's left arm with both of your palms (arms shooting upwards).
  • Circle your left arm around your opponent's right elbow, trapping their arm and bending it inwards.
  • Lift up your left arm (chamber for knifehand strike) to wind back your opponent's body. You can pop their elbow by extending your arm (knifehand strike) and attempt to throw them by turning 180-degrees as you do in the form.
Left: App for movements 25b-26.
Middle: The lock from the Encyclopedia of Taekwon-Do
Right: Jon Jones using the lock in UFC 172.
The left hand is closed because it is the active hand, and the movement is performed in slow motion to represent that it is manipulating the opponent's body (not that you would actually perform the movement in slow motion), as opposed to being a hard block or strike.

This lock is known as maki hiji in jujitsu, and is present in Gen. Choi's Encyclopedia of Taekwon-Do. It gained some notoriety a few years back when Jon Jones used it in the UFC. You can see a Jujitsu player demonstrating the lock in the gif below, as well as using the turn as a takedown. The difference is that the Jujitsu player uses a two-step tenkan turn, whereas in Koryo it seems that you only move one leg before turning.

Source: Submissions 101
The defense to this lock is basically to pull in the opponent before they can get a solid crank, as explained by Stephen Kestling here.

Credit to Orjan Nilsen for suggesting a front bear hug defense for the set, and to Peter Jones for the idea that a circular low section block could be used to make a maki hiji lock.

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