Thursday, December 14, 2017

13: Choong-Jang ground kick, a falling technique?

The ground roundhouse kick in Choong-Jang (move 12) is an annoying move to perform, as well as to find a proper application for. The idea that you should go to the ground just to kick an opponent's groin doesn't hold much water, so usually one of two alternative explanations is proposed:
  • The form assumes you have fallen to the ground and this is you trying to keep back an opponent until you can get up again
  • The movement is a drop takedown
Sources:
Stephen Kestling
PracticalKataBunkai
KravMagaDFW
The first one isn't very satisfying, because we begin from a standing position. Nor does it look like any ground kicks found in other arts. (For some examples, see the right image). The second idea is interesting, but I have difficultly coming up with a practical drop throw based on the footwork. In the original set in Woo-Nam, the move preceding the ground kick is a sliding lunge punch, not a flat spearhand thrust, so it seems that moves 11 and 12 were not originally intended to be a part of the same set.

However I did recently think up an idea similar to the first option: what if it's a falling technique? The difference being that you can use the footwork prescribed in the form to get into the ground kick position. In fact, the collapse down onto one knee looks like the first part of an Aikido falling technique an instructor once showed me, in response to a strong shove that will take you to the ground. After searching online I found an example, shown in the gif below.
Source: AikidoInstitute
The backwards roll is the advanced version. What I want to call attention to is the first part of the technique, where the aikidoka cross-steps the back leg and collapses onto his back knee/hip. Instead of doing a roll, from here you can use both palms to hit the floor, bracing you. As this point, you have the exact setup for the roundhouse kick in Choong-Jang/Woo-Nam.
Backroll setup vs Choong-Jang ground kick setup.
Source: AikidoInstitute, Taekwondo-Mika
My point is that the set is probably meant to be applied against someone pushing you to the ground, not that you begin on the ground. Is it a set I envision myself ever using? Not really, but I find it a more reasonable explanation than the two provided above. After you brace yourself, kick your opponent with the ball of the foot roundhouse kick.

The rest of the set

What about the ground punch directly afterwards? Punching the opponent's groin? Actually, I prefer Paul O'Leary's explanation (which he details in this post) that it's a takedown. The back hand traps the opponent's instep while the "punch" pushes out on their knee, taking them to the ground. From here, still controlling your opponent's leg, you use the next two movements in the form -- clockwise step into side elbow strike followed by clockwise turn into closed fist guarding block -- to flip the opponent onto their stomach and possibly get a leg lock.
An example of forcing the opponent onto their stomach with a clockwise turn. It's difficult to see, but the tori semi-circles around with his left leg, keeping his right leg in place. Source: Judoinfo.com/leglocks

Edit 10-2-2018: I've reconsidered the drop takedown idea. If the flat spearhand thrust is used to push away the opponent's face while their right arm is pulled, that does put them off-balance which makes a drop takedown feasible. The roundhouse kick and knee push could then be used if the opponent slips free. But still, this could not have been the use of the drop in Woo-Nam, so I'm not totally certain why it's included.

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