Thursday, October 19, 2017

9: Po-Eun leg lift

Source (right image): MEMAG
The final two moves of Po-Eun are
  • Cross step into X-stance low front block, with the opposite palm hitting the the side of the fist
  • Step out in the same direction into riding stance low ridgehand guarding block
Unlike the knifehand low front block in Kwang-Gae, there are no instructions for the movement to be circular. Personally I prefer grappling interpretations for Po-Eun; the preceding set works well as a headlock defense, for example. However, the low front block is usually explained as blocking a front kick, so I think it's worth first exploring that application.

Front kick defense

First question: can the movement be practically applied against a front kick? Yes, actually, but not in the way you might think.

You never want to block a front kick straight on. Rather, you want to get off the line of fire and deflect the kick. One simple way to do this is by twisting your body. Take a look at the gif from one of Dan Djurdjevic's older videos.
Source: Dan Djurdjevic
Notice how after twisting, he takes a cross step in towards his opponent. He uses his front arm not as a hard block but rather as a deflection. So the X-stance low front block does work against a front kick, but the trick is that you should be facing sideways from your opponent. We can use the opposite hand (the palm hitting the side of the fist) to catch the leg after deflecting.

What's neat about this defense is that it works no matter what leg the opponent kicks with, and we can still utilize the ending move of Po-Eun as a takedown. If you catch the leg from outside, then you just use your forearm to press down your opponent's torso while lifting their leg.


But what if you catch the leg from inside? This is where the grappling interpretation comes in.

Leg lift with inside trip

Suppose we are not facing a front kick but are rather in a grappling situation. The low front block can be used as a two-handed leg pick, using the cross step to get close. You then step through the opponent's legs into the riding stance, setting up an inside trip, and lift their leg. The chamber for the guarding block -- raising both arms back -- comprises the actual throw, but as the opponent falls your arms naturally go into the low ridgehand guarding block position.
Source: MEMAG
If you catch an opponent's front kick from the inside, you can use this throw as well.

It's worth noting that the source video shows two counters to this throw, one of which is just a strike to the thrower's head. Using both hands to grab a leg leaves your head exposed, so think carefully about when it's proper to apply this technique. You might apply the previous two moves in the form as strikes: an elbow strike to the throat followed by a low hammerfist to the groin. This will distract your opponent and allow you to go for the leg lift. As before, you should be facing your opponent more-or-less sideways.
Striking applications for the preceding two moves (15-16/33-34).
Sources: DTDTRyan Parker

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