Friday, December 8, 2017

12: Do-San (and Taebaek) 360-degree spin

A while ago I posted some applications for the 360-degree spin in Do-San. Looking back, I realized that I provided no application with the guarding block beforehand. So in this post I'm going to provide two: one for Do-San and one for a variant of the set used in the kukki-taekwondo form Taebaek. The first application, an overhook and torso push, is shown in the gif below.

Source: WeAreGoodCompany
Details:
  • Use the knifehand guarding block simply as a block, deflecting a punch outward while stepping in. (In the gif, you can also see the chamber used as a block)
  • Overhook the opponent's arm with the supporting arm of the supported spearhand thrust
  • Now that you have the overhook, use the spearhand to push onto the opponent's torso, or perhaps their face.
  • Use the 360-degree spin while pushing on the opponent's torso/face to take them to the ground, pulling with the left hand (backfist)
Most schools practice a downward "release motion" in the set (although neither the 1965 or 1985 versions of the form instruct this). This can be used to aggressively push down the opponent before spinning. The 1985 version of the set instructs a turning of the palm. This can be used if you are pressing on your opponent's face to turn it downwards, causing them to further lose balance. In the gif the defender steps behind the opponent to do the throw. This is ideal, but even if you can't step behind you can try using the whole 360-degree spin as the takedown.

A similar technique can be seen in the gif by Dan Djurdjevic below. Here the pull back (guarding block chamber) is used to pull the opponent's arm. As the opponent resists, move back in the forward direction (guarding block), and then get the overhook and torso push.

Source: Dan Djurdjevic
The overhook and torso push is the first deeper application I would teach to a student. It's simple to remember and to perform.

Taebaek version

The kukki-taekwondo form Taebaek has this set, and performs it almost like we do, but they add in a strange motion: pulling the spearhand behind the back before you turn. I don't practice this form, but something it might be is encircling the opponent's head, in order to throw them as you spin. In this case the intended application would be a head-and-arm throw.
Sources: TaekwonWoo, James St. Pierre
  • Use the knifehand guarding block (called "double knifehand block") as a grappling position. Back palm gets a collar tie, front palm gribs their arm.
  • Step through (spearhand thrust) and then encircle opponent's head while pivoting (pulling the arm behind the back)
  • Finally, use the spin into backfist as a hip throw
This hip throw application also works for Do-San, as the downward release motion some clubs practice can also be used to wrap the head.

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